Carbon Monoxide Alarms

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, tasteless, odorless and highly toxic gas. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

We sell and recommend the Carrier® CO alarm, which uses sophisticated sensor technology to detect and record levels of CO. You can monitor the current CO level in your home on a large, easy-to-read digital display. When dangerous levels of CO are present, a loud, audible alarm alerts you and your family automatically. Call our office for details or ask your service technician.

A Carbon Monoxide Detector Provides Peace of Mind

  • Monitors CO levels updating every 15 seconds
  • Uses highly sensitive, CO-specific electrochemical sensor
  • Detects and stores CO levels as low as 11 and as high as 999 parts per million (ppm)
  • Loud, 85 decibel pulsing alarm
  • Peak level button displays the highest CO level recorded since alarm was last reset or unplugged
  • Power outage backup battery protection
  • Lithium ion battery does not require replacement
  • Plugs into any standard electrical outlet and comes with a slide out support and extended power cord for tabletop placement
  • 7-year limited warranty
Carrier carbon monoxide alarms

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs. Additional ventilation can be used as a temporary measure when high levels of CO are expected for short periods of time.

  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Consider purchasing a vented space heater when replacing an unvented one.
  • Use proper fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Install and use an exhaust fan vented to outdoors over gas stoves.
  • Open flues when fireplaces are in use.
  • Choose properly sized wood stoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that doors on all wood stoves fit tightly.
  • Have a trained professional inspect, clean, and tune-up central heating system (furnaces, flues, and chimneys) annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle the car inside garage.